80 Burnout Statistics: Remote Work, Workplace Stress, and More

80 Burnout Statistics: Remote Work, Workplace Stress, and More

80 Burnout Statistics: Remote Work, Workplace Stress, and More
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Burnout is a state of emotional, physical, and mental exhaustion caused by excessive and prolonged stress. It occurs when you feel overwhelmed, emotionally drained, and unable to meet constant demands.

As the stress continues, you begin to lose the interest and motivation that led you to take on a particular role in the first place. Burnout reduces productivity and saps your energy, leaving you feeling increasingly helpless, hopeless, cynical, and resentful. Eventually, you may feel like you have nothing more to give.

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  • Conversely, having a supportive manager decreases the likelihood of employee burnout by 62%.7
  • Burnout is linked to an increased risk of mental health issues, with one study showing that over 60% of work absences are due to psychological stress.11
  • Among leaders who report feeling exhausted daily, 44% believe they need to switch companies to progress, compared to 24% of other leaders, highlighting the impact of burnout on retention.12
  • Financially stressed employees were five times more likely to be distracted by personal finance issues at work, with 21% of surveyed workers having multiple jobs, especially those struggling to pay bills (24%) or unable to do so regularly (27%). 30
  • Approximately 60% of employees felt negative impacts from work-related stress, including reduced interest, motivation, and energy (26%), lower work effort (19%), cognitive weariness (36%), emotional exhaustion (32%), and a significant 38% increase in physical fatigue, affecting 44% since 2019. 51
  • In this article, we will explore some statistics related to workplace stress and burnout, identifying their main causes and effects.

    Employer Burnout Mitigation Statistics

    Burnout has become a serious concern that compels companies to reevaluate their work policies. Data on how employers are working to prevent burnout offers a sobering view of how current approaches are faring in protecting the health of their employees.

    Being overwhelmed means that your life or work is overpowering you. Regain control by clarifying your intentions, setting realistic expectations and focusing on your next step.

    ― Daphne Michaels (Author, Human Potential Expert, and Personal Growth Trainer)

    • Moreover, the burnout rate for women has nearly doubled compared to men, with about 42% of women experiencing burnout. This rise is linked to their increased workload and the emotional strain of juggling work and personal responsibilities.22
    • Job turnover due to burnout affects 40% of employees, highlighting its substantial effect on the ability of companies to maintain their staff.7
    • Approximately 24% of workers think that more adaptable work arrangements and a better equilibrium between professional and personal time could avert burnout.2
    • Additionally, 44% of workers attribute their high volume of work as a significant cause of burnout.3
    • 40% of employees identified burnout as a primary reason for quitting. Notably, 28% of respondents were so dissatisfied that they resigned without securing a new job.23
    • Workplace stress inflicts an average annual cost of around $300 billion on the U.S economy.4
    • Included in these costs, health-related expenditures due to employee absence, decreased productivity, and occupational injuries contribute $190 billion each year.4
    • 44% of K-12 employees, including 52% of teachers, report feeling burned out at work "always" or "very often." Similarly, 35% of college and university staff experience frequent burnout. This places K-12 and higher education as the industries with the highest burnout rates.5
    K-12, a term commonly used in the education sector in countries like the United States and Canada that represents the publicly funded school grades before college. This includes kindergarten (abbreviated as 'K') and the grades from first to twelfth (1-12).
    • Moreover, in larger companies employing over 5,000 workers, burnout occurs more frequently.7
    • 21% of the workforce surveyed reported having no access to burnout intervention measures.7
    • Nearly half, at 49%, of employers still need an established strategy for employee wellbeing.7
    • Conversely, having a supportive manager decreases the likelihood of employee burnout by 62%.7
    Burnout is more than a buzzword; it's a major workplace crisis, hitting women particularly hard and leading many employees to quit, sometimes without a backup job.23 This issue costs the U.S economy $300 billion annually, with teachers facing some of the highest burnout rates. It's a call to action for genuine, empathetic solutions.4
    • 41% of individuals working over 50 hours weekly report their company lacks any burnout prevention program, while 32% are still determining its existence.7
    • 23% of employees reported feeling burned out at work very often or always, while an additional 44% reported feeling burned out sometimes.1
    • 46% of HR leaders attribute 20%-50% of yearly employee turnover to burnout.8
    • Approximately 10% of HR leaders estimate that burnout contributes to over 50% of annual workforce turnover.8
    • 70% of professionals believe their employers are not doing enough to prevent or mitigate burnout.9
    • During the COVID-19 pandemic, 69% of workers experienced symptoms of burnout while working from home, marking a 35% increase from the early May 2020 figure of 51%.10
    • Employees suffering from high burnout are 23% more likely to visit the emergency room.1
    The Causes and Effects of Burnout in the Workplace
    The Causes and Effects of Burnout in the Workplace

    • Burnout is linked to an increased risk of mental health issues, with one study showing that over 60% of work absences are due to psychological stress.11
    • Among leaders who report feeling exhausted daily, 44% believe they need to switch companies to progress, compared to 24% of other leaders, highlighting the impact of burnout on retention.12
    • Employees who feel strongly supported by their manager are approximately 70% less likely to experience burnout regularly.1
    • 42% of women report frequent or near-constant burnout, up from 32% the previous year. Additionally, one in three women has contemplated exiting the workforce or reducing their career commitments.13
    • 82% of employees occasionally experience job burnout, with 25% feeling this way frequently or constantly.14

    Burnout in the workplace is a widespread issue, hitting over 60% of workers and prompting leaders to look for exits.11 While wellness programs work wonders for some, nearly half the companies still need to catch up on how to tackle it.

    The result? 70% of employees feel their bosses need to get the memo on keeping work-life upbeat.9 It's a wake-up call for a better work-life balance. Moving into the next section, we’ll find out how burnout has influenced remote work and how it has affected organizations' workforce.

    Remote Work Burnout Frequency Statistics

    The shift to remote work, which started as an adjustment during the pandemic, has become a staple of the professional environment, leading to new job-related stress. The data points to an increase in burnout for those working from home, where the overlap of work and personal space muddies the distinction between work responsibilities and home life.

    • Approximately 40% of individuals engaged in remote work find it challenging to disconnect from their job responsibilities, citing this as their main concern.7
    • In addition, around 28% of remote workers report higher levels of burnout in comparison to their colleagues working in traditional office settings.7
    • 86% of full-time remote workers are experiencing burnout.15
    • The work environment significantly influences mental and emotional health. A substantial 76% of respondents acknowledge that workplace stress impacts their mental health, causing depression or anxiety, with 17% strongly agreeing.24
    • An overwhelming 73% of the American workforce feels the mental toll of stress from their jobs.7
    • 81% of remote workers report checking work emails outside regular hours, with 63% doing so on weekends and 34% during vacations.25
    The transition to remote work, a necessity during the pandemic, has unexpectedly increased job stress and burnout. Around 40% of remote workers struggle to disconnect from work, leading to a higher burnout rate than office employees, with 86% of full-time remote workers reporting burnout.7

    This stress is taking a toll on mental health, with a significant portion of the workforce, including in the nonprofit sector, experiencing depression or anxiety. Surprisingly, despite these challenges, some remote workers aren't taking much-needed breaks, with 15% not using any vacation time. It's a clear sign that the work-from-home lifestyle creates a complex blend of flexibility and strain on mental well-being.
    • For 67% of remote workers, the primary advantage of remote work is flexibility, followed closely by saving time due to no commute (63%) and the freedom to live anywhere (60%).26
    • Following the shift to remote work, 55% of workers believe that their workday has become longer.7
    • During the pandemic-induced transition to remote work, 47% of companies observed a rise in the use of personal devices for work purposes.16
    • Consequently, 82% of these organizations now support bring your own device (BYOD) policies to a certain degree.16
    • A significant 86% of remote workers experience some degree of burnout compared to 70% amongst on-site workers.7
    • On-site staff, in contrast, have a lower burnout rate, with 70% reporting burnout.7
    • Hybrid workers fall in the middle, with 81% experiencing moderate burnout. levels.7
    • 77% of respondents report experiencing employee burnout at their current job, with over half indicating multiple occurrences.9
    • 91% of employees have unmanageable stress or frustration affecting their work quality.9
    • 83% said burnout could negatively impact personal relationships.9
    • 67% of remote workers felt pressured always to be available.15
    • 48% of remote workers reported a lack of emotional support from employers.15
    Manager Burnout Rates by Generation

    • Only 30% of remote workers manage to completely avoid working on weekends.15
    • 51% felt they did not have employer support to deal with burnout.15
    • 45% noted an increase in work hours since the pandemic began.15
    • 81% of hybrid workers and 70% of in-office workers also reported burnout, indicating it is not exclusive to remote work​.15
    • 33% of workers surveyed expressed they did not want to work from home in the future.15
    • 49% of remote workers felt overwhelmed by their work and personal responsibilities.15

    These statistics provide a snapshot of the challenges and stressors associated with remote work, highlighting the importance of employer support and the potential drawbacks of remote work environments. While remote work can offer flexibility and other benefits, it can also come with challenges that could lead to burnout and stress within the workplace.

    Workplace Stress Statistics

    Work stress, formally known as occupational stress, is a common but insidious presence in the professional landscape.

    It emerges from the various pressures and demands of the workplace, affecting many employees. This stress not only affects mental health but also takes a physical toll. It can sneak into all aspects of life, impacting job performance and dimming the overall quality of life.

    More than just a bad day at the office, work stress is a pervasive issue that reshapes an individual's personal and professional experience.

    • Almost half of employees (48%) attribute workplace stress to their lack of involvement in decisions, marking a notable rise from the 2019 survey (39%).17
    • Lower-level employees, particularly front-line (67%) and mid-level (64%) workers, experience more work-related stress than upper-level employees (54%).17
    • Additionally, 35% of front-line workers have felt frustrated at work quite often in the past 30 days.17
    • A mere 5% of employees indicate that they have low levels of stress.27
    • In the workplace, chronic stress is widespread, as evidenced by 94% of employees reporting experiencing stress at work.30
    • Stress affects the home lives of 54% of employees.28
    • Millions of individuals are balancing their professional and personal commitments, and 48% of U.S employees experience mental and physical exhaustion after work, with an additional 41% reporting burnout.33
    • Approximately 60% of employees felt negative impacts from work-related stress, including reduced interest, motivation, and energy (26%), lower work effort (19%), cognitive weariness (36%), emotional exhaustion (32%), and a significant 38% increase in physical fatigue, affecting 44% since 2019.51
    • Yelling is a common occurrence in the workplace for 42% of employees.34
    Work stress is a constant presence, affecting both mental and physical well-being. About 60% of employees experience negative effects, including reduced energy and motivation, lower work effort, cognitive weariness, emotional exhaustion, and increased physical fatigue since 2019.51

    Additionally, nearly half attribute their stress to a lack of control, with lower-level employees feeling it more. Frustration, exhaustion, and burnout are common; workplace yelling is a reality for 42% of employees.34 Stress also impacts home lives for over half of them.
    • A significant 80% of workers encounter stress in their professional lives, and almost half of them, approximately 50%, seek assistance to manage this stress.4
    • Smaller yet significant percentages report experiencing high levels of stress (29%) and feeling overwhelmed (19%) at work consistently.37
    • After the pandemic, a significant majority of the workforce, specifically 67%, have noticed an increase in stress and burnout related to their work.31
    • 83% of American employees experience work-related stress, and for 25%, their job is the primary source of stress in their lives.26
    • Among this group, 40% of workers found their jobs "very or extremely stressful," while 26% frequently experienced burnout or stress due to work, and 29% felt significantly stressed in their workplace.35
    • Over the past month, a significant 79% of individuals have experienced stress associated with their work.31
    • An astonishing 57% of American workers face daily stress that is directly connected to their employment.32
    • 80% of employees reported occasional work-related stress, and 60% of absenteeism was linked to stress in some manner.29
    Employees Experiencing Impacts From Work-Related Stress
    Employees Experiencing Impacts From Work-Related Stress

    • While 87% of surveyed professionals express passion for their current jobs, 64% report frequent stress, challenging the notion that passionate employees are immune to stress or burnout.9
    • Among those who predominantly work remotely, 41% experience consistently high-stress levels "always" or "most of the time."7
    • Financially stressed employees were five times more likely to be distracted by personal finance issues at work, with 21% of surveyed workers having multiple jobs, especially those struggling to pay bills (24%) or unable to do so regularly (27%).30
    • The majority, specifically 65% of workers, report that workplace stress has led to difficulties, and more than 10% of them describe these effects as significant.4

    Passion doesn't shield us from stress at work. Despite 87% loving their jobs, 64% grapple with stress, even in remote roles (41% stress rate). Healthcare costs worry 57%, and financial stress hampers focus. 80% face workplace stress, and 67% felt pandemic-induced burnout.

    For 83% of Americans, work is a stress source, contributing to 60% of absenteeism. Prioritizing mental well-being is vital in our stress-filled work journey.

    Frequently Asked Questions

    Q1: What is burnout?

    Burnout is a state of physical, emotional, and mental exhaustion often caused by prolonged exposure to high levels of stress or excessive demands, typically in a work-related context. It can lead to feelings of cynicism, reduced performance, and a sense of being overwhelmed.

    Q2: What are the common signs and symptoms of burnout?

    Common signs of burnout include chronic fatigue, reduced motivation and enthusiasm, increased irritability, difficulty concentrating, disrupted sleep patterns, and physical symptoms like headaches or muscle tension.

    Q3: What are the leading causes of burnout?

    Burnout can be triggered by various factors, including:

    • Heavy workloads
    • Long hours
    • Lack of control over one's work
    • Insufficient support from colleagues or supervisors
    • A mismatch between one's values and the job demands

    Q4: How can I prevent burnout?

    Preventing burnout involves maintaining a healthy work-life balance, setting boundaries, practicing stress management techniques (such as meditation or exercise), seeking social support, and addressing work-related stressors proactively. It's also essential to take breaks and prioritize self-care.

    Q5: What should I do if I suspect I'm experiencing burnout?

    If you suspect you're experiencing burnout, seeking help and taking steps to address it is important. This may involve talking to your supervisor about workload concerns, seeking support from a therapist or counselor, or considering changes to your work situation or responsibilities.

    Final Thoughts

    Unfortunately, employee burnout rates are increasing even after the pandemic. However, the positive aspect is that with appropriate engagement programs and mental support initiatives, team leaders and HR managers can lower stress levels and prevent burnout.

    By delving into burnout statistics and engaging in conversations about the effectiveness of strategies within your organization, you can bridge the gap between employers and employees, foster an improved working environment for your team, and effectively address burnout.

    At flair, we believe that technology can help HR teams and managers to improve the employee experience while improving the organization’s productivity and efficiency. Our HR solution built on Salesforce empowers HR professionals and team leaders to shape a better, healthier work culture.

    flair's employee surveys and data-driven insights help organizations identify stress patterns and intervene early. With flair, you can configure time-tracking and absence policies that boost overall organizational productivity and morale, while reducing the risk of burnout.

    Book a demo today

    Sources

    1. Gallup Report [Employee Burnout, Part 1]
    2. HR Executive Survey
    3. Open Access Government
    4. American Institute of Stress Report [Workplace Stress]
    5. Gallup Report [K-12 Workers Have Highest Burnout Rate in U.S.]
    6. Aflcio Report
    7. MarketSplash Report [65+ Burnout Statistics]
    8. Kronos Report
    9. Deloitte Report [Workplace Burnout Survey]
    10. Monster Report
    11. PsychologyToday Report
    12. DDI World Report
    13. McKinsey Report
    14. Heart.org Survey Results
    15. Zippia Report [Remote Work Burnout Statistics]
    16. Business Wire Report
    17. American Psychological Association Survey Results
    18. World Population Review
    19. Global Data Report
    20. PayScale
    21. 10 Years First Round
    22. McKinsey Report
    23. Limeade Report
    24. Flex Jobs Report
    25. Buffer Report
    26. Zippia Report
    27. Wrike Report
    28. The American Institute of Stress Report
    29. PwC Survey
    30. The American Institute of Stress Report
    31. Zippia Report
    32. Gallup Report
    33. SHRM Report
    34. TonerBuzz
    35. NIOSH Report
    36. Deloitte Report
    37. Pew Research Report
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